Using Persuasive Writing in Bids and Proposals

Using Persuasive Writing in Bids and Proposals

Obtaining grant funding or winning a contract can be competitive, with hundreds of organisations applying for the same funding. The wording of your bid or proposal can significantly affect your chances of success. Whether it is a tender or grant funding application, persuasive writing is vital to a successful submission. Writing a proposal that stands out from your competitors’ can be a daunting experience but there are a few rules which will help you to implement persuasive writing in your approach as follows:

  1. Write clear and concise sentences that are easy for the evaluator to understand. Your documents must have a clear and defined structure with a logical and well-organised approach. You must clearly outline the scope of your proposal through the language and structure used so that it is clear to the evaluator what it is you intend to deliver and how this will be achieved.
  2. Write compelling and engaging copy. Compelling copy requires a delicate balance between the formal and informal. For example, a proposal is an important document, but it shouldn’t be treated as formally as a legal document, nor should it be treated as a marketing poster portraying a more relaxed attitude. However, it must be a tailored proposal which means carrying out research about the funder or buyer which will raise the chances of winning the funding or contract dramatically.
  3. Use graphics, images and charts to bring life to your proposal and drive home your unique selling points. Evaluators are there to analyse your proposal. It must therefore be clear and specific but not boring. Nobody likes to read through a great wall of text and using text in isolation may risk losing the evaluator’s attention and losing sight of your unique selling points. Graphics are very effective at promoting the information that you want to stand out to the evaluator.
  4. Identify the unique selling points of your proposal and ensure these are effectively communicated and highlighted. Every organisation has unique selling points that differentiate them from the rest. This must be easily identifiable for the evaluator. Your organisation’s unique selling points should be consistently embedded throughout the proposal to provide a strong argument as to what sets you aside from your competitors.
  5. Use a logical argument to identify the issues, propose the solutions and state why your organisation is best placed to deliver the solutions. Don’t just discuss a problem, be ready with a solution. Otherwise your proposal could seem irrelevant to an evaluator who hasn’t been able to find a solution within the submitted proposal. Ultimately, being logical will affect the effectiveness of your bid.
  6. Back up your statements with factual evidence to provide assurance of your capability to deliver. Every evaluator will have strict guidelines and criteria to follow in evaluating your proposal. Give them all of the information that they want with a logical and evidentiary basis to ensure that the evaluator knows you will deliver results.
  7. Ensure to include mandatory attachments. Many evaluators will completely disqualify a submitted tender or proposal if a mandatory attachment hasn’t been included. Ensuring to include all mandatory attachments means that your evaluator can easily award marks for the basics.

If you need additional help with tender writing, grant funding applications or editing and proof reading your proposal you can find  more information on the services we provide on our website or contact us. If you enjoyed this article, please feel free to share it on your favourite social media sites.

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